Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Dutch Oven Sweet & Savory Chicken


This week’s entry was born of convenience. I decided to cook outdoors, since the temperature was to be a balmy 40+ degrees F (that’s about 10 higher than “normal” here in northern utah for this time of year). So, I looked around to see what I could make. Chicken we had in abundance, but what, oh, what to do with it?

I thought of a few ideas, but nothing was really tempting me. I looked in the pantry and got a few thoughts going, and finally settled on a can of pineapple and a can of beans.

Hmmmm... Sweet, savory... It was starting to come together.

A few trips to google for some more ideas, and then we had a final result!

Dutch Oven Sweet & Savory Chicken over Rice

12” Shallow Dutch Oven
20+ coals underneath for sauteing, browning
16-18 coals above, 8-12 coals below for the final cook

8” Dutch Oven
8-10 coals below

Marinade:
1-2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Black pepper
1 tsp Paprika
1/4 cup honey
1/2 cup soy sauce
Zest and juice of 3 limes

2 lbs boneless skinless chicken breast, thawed and cubed

Vegetable oil
1-2 medium Onions, diced
4-5 cloves Garlic, minced
salt

2 15oz cans black beans
1-2 20 oz cans Pineapple tidbits
Liberal shakes of:
  Dill weed
  Paprika
  Oregano
  Parsley
Not quite as liberal shakes of:
  Cayenne pepper

3 cups chicken broth (or water, if you don't have broth)
1.5 cups rice

I started by mixing the ingredients of the marinade in a bowl. These measurements are approximate. Then, I cubed the chicken to about 1” cubes, and added the chunks to the bowl, stirring it up. Once the chicken is added, you could put in more honey, soy sauce, and juice to coat the chicken. I set all that aside for an hour or so in the fridge. You could soak it longer, even overnight.

Then, when I was ready to start cooking, I lit up a bunch of coals, and while that was heating up, I diced the onions and minced the garlic. I put my 12” dutch oven on the coals, as listed above, with a little oil, and let that heat up. Since I was going to saute, and then brown the meat, I wanted it to be pretty hot, at least at the start. Once the oil was a bit shimmery, I tossed in the onions and the garlic (if it sizzles a lot when you do this, you were hot enough. If it doesn’t sizzle, wait longer next time.). Then, I sprinkled on a bit of salt and tossed the onions. The salt helps draw out the moisture in addition to upping the flavor ante.

Then, after a few minutes, I tossed in the garlic. Garlic will brown quicker than onions, and can actually burn before the onions are done if you put them in at the same time.

Once the onions were nice and translucent, I put in just a bit more oil, stirred that up and tossed in the chicken. I stirred it frequently, getting it mostly cooked. It doesn’t have to be FULLY cooked through, though, because you’ll be baking it in the final step.

Once the chicken was cooked on the outside, I added the beans and the pineapple (you can adjust the amounts based on how big your Dutch oven is, how much chicken you used, and how many you’re feeding.  Then, I added in all of the flavorings, put on the lid, and adjusted the coals for the final cooking stage, some on top and some on the bottom. From then on, I only had to stir it occasionally, and check the taste for the adjustment of the seasonings.

While that was cooking, I put the broth and the rice in the 8” Dutch Oven, and set it on its own coals. In this blog entry, I talk about how to cook rice accurately every time!  The other chicken recipe is also great and something you might want to do sometime!
Once it was all cooked, it felt a bit too liquid-y to me, so I took the lid off and piled fresh coals underneath and simmered it for a bit to reduce the liquid. You could also sprinkle in some cornstarch and stir, too.

Finally, I served it up on the plate of rice with a bit of salad on the side! It was amazing!




Mark has discovered a love of Dutch Oven Cooking. Mark also has other sites and blogs, including MarkHansenMusic.com and his MoBoy blog.

2 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  2. In doing this you will find that your blog markets itself. Keep in mind that with each appliance, there's the price of the item together with the price of the energy required to maintain it. thebestsmoothieblender.net offers some in-depth insights on Here's The Best Blender You Absolutely Need In Your Kitchen.

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails